Posted in family, health, rural life, Self Care, writing

#SundayStills Falling for Fall

Time rushes madly on

Seasons change

Seconds tumble by

As the leaves rustle

Harvest beckons us all

Daylight shrinks

Moon glows amber

Calling geese

Each day I do take time to stop and appreciate all that I have and am. Challenges continue to arise and Covid continues to throw its weight around in our area so we are keeping a low profile. I won’t say it’s a quiet life as harvest, teaching and family commitments have kept me busy. Blogging time has been very minimal and I am behind in reading other blog posts as well.

Hope all is well in your worlds. I hope to be back more regularly one of these fine days.

Bernie

If I had been on the ball last night I would have linked this to the #Sundaystills hosted by Terri again over at https://secondwindleisure.com/2021/09/26/sunday-stills-signs-of-autumn-spring/. Better late than never I guess!

Posted in pandemic, Projects, Random ramblings, writing

Head Down Blinders On

A mere few decade of months ago I read the words that Kitty O’Meara penned and wrote a post called Not at Peace. The original words would roll around in my head occasionally but now they don’t seem to ring true. Sadly those words were lost on far too many here and around the world. The change in the tone texture of these words have been rattling around in my head for a while.

But then I worried. Is this plagiarism? So I called up the services of an impartial outside editor to review what I wrote and get an honest opinion. We had a long phone conversation (in itself a wonderful delight) and in the end I felt that the artistic license with the words were honouring the original structure but changing the intent. Which is allowable, perhaps even encouraged? I even found a poetry site that the first lesson was to change a classic poem by switching out certain words and in those examples they put the revisions in bold as I have done below.

“Imitation, conscious imitation, is one of the great methods, perhaps the method of learning to write. The ancients, the Elizabethans, knew this, profited by it, and were not disturbed. As a son of Ben [Jonson], Herrick more than once rewrote Jonson, who, in turn, drew heavily on the classics. And so on.”—Theodore Roethke, “How to Write Like Somebody Else”

Continue reading “Head Down Blinders On”