Posted in Travel

Medieval Steps

Today we ventured into the medieval past and stepped back to 1460 at Gainsborough Hall. This is a wonderfully preserved specimen of a rich baron’s home.

As two people who love architectural and historical details it was a win win for sure. Add to that how well it was presented and the fact that we got in for the “concession” rate available for seniors it was a double bonus.

The great hall is so wonderfully preserved. The ceiling alone is worth the admission price. The stone tower, the buttery (where the butler stored the beer,wine and meed) and the pantry added to the ambience.

The half timbered building was started by the Burgh family who have the most interesting history and connections to royalty. It was built between 1460 & 1470 by Sir Thomas Burgh; a wealthy, powerful and flamboyant man.
His grandson died in 1528, leaving his eldest son, sir Thomas as head of the family. In 1529, his son and heir, Sir Edward, married Catherine Parr, The couple would stay at Gainsborough Old Hall until 1530, when they were granted their own manor in Village of Kirton-in-Lindsay.(see side note in an upcoming post about that town and my connection to it).

In this hall both Richard the 3rd and Henry 8th dined. The latter visited Gainsborough twice; once in 1509 and again in 1541 with the doomed Queen Catherine Howard. The Queen was accused of indiscretions both at Gainsborough & Lincoln and she was executed. Catherine Parr, by this time a widow became the final wife of Henry 8th.

But what really fascinated both of us was the kitchen rooms. They hadn’t been modernized anywhere along the way and the interpretive displays were so well done. Even the ceiling was fascinating with a cupola for letting out smoke still intact. The size of the fireplaces was so massif and the 2 bread ovens were amazing. The kitchen servants lived above the kitchen in assorted little rooms.

The family had the east wing complete with the tour room while the guests stayed in the West wing. Outside on south was a garden which replaces the original market that stood there. It’s a great example of what a medieval garden would have looked like.

The windows alone show the amount of money that was poured into this establishment. That doesn’t even touch upon all the other items that highlight what am amazingly well preserved manor home this is.

We climbed the 49 steps up to the top of the tower. We saw the amazing views but also the Tudor Rose carved into a ceiling that Henry 8th was never going to see even though it was put there to prove their loyalty. Instead; tourists hundreds of years later stare at it and are amazed at the workmanship.

There are more pictures, says the person with hundreds of photos on her phone, but alas I have not figured out how to do a slide show of them here from my phone. I also can’t remember what program my friend uses for putting hers into a gallery of nine. So that means that’s it for this post.

Bernie

I just learnt tonight that my cousin and her husband went to a Hunt Ball in the late 70’s in the great hall before it became a museum. How cool is that?

Posted in 1918 Eatons' House, garden, Projects

Something from Nothing, Year 2

There has finally been a bit of a break in the unseasonably cold snowy fall weather. The combines are going full force late into the evening and we completed a significant portion of our fall yard work on the weekend. Construction season ended too early but now we have time to focus on a few other items.

So armed with a chainsaw and a clipper we started gathering materials so I could decorate the planters that remain outside. It’s so nice to have some colours and textures in them during the non growing season.

I think my favourite view of it is the one below; partly because it’s through clean windows! It’s a long day to do the 128 window panes and 16 door panels but it’s so worth it. We are so blessed with our house space and our rural life that the work is just fair trade for that.

I love the flower pots and the cost was nil this year as the few hardscapes are from previous years. Even then the rule was that I won’t spend more than $25 for any item so it’s mostly salvage from various spots. I’m so pleased with the results of my something from nothing this year.

I have plans to add a cross and poppies in November and then dress it with lites and outside flowers for the Christmas season in December. I think it will look better than it does sometimes in the summer when I’m struggling to get the plants to grow.

Bernie

Posted in Food, garden

Domestic Goddess

Every once in a while there are some particularly funny social media posts. A particular one about domestic goddesses, in which I was tagged, cracked me up. I truly forget that not everyone has the cooking, preserving, baking and gardening gene or even likes to do those things. I’m quite sure, whether you are a non kitchen person or an old hand at canning, this post below will crack you up!! These are Mar’s on words and hashtag.

A little advice to the NEWBIE CANNER…

1)when your friend offers you 10lbs of beets and 10lbs of carrots RUN!… not having a canner won’t wash as an excuse because I guarantee that one will show up at your doorstep … my best advice is to say you hate carrots and beets…… Brenda you a smart cookie !

2) when experienced canners say” it will only take an hour or two … bank on 10…. we don’t know the shortcuts yet!!

3) warn your hubby that you are cooking beets…. otherwise it will appear to him that you have had a meltdown in the kitchen and killed something or someone with your bare hands… from the fridge to the sink to the stove and even the ceiling( that one took some talent) ….beet DNA is everywhere!!

4) Peeling garlic sucks ass

5) Once you have successfully converted quarts to liters and concocted your brine TRIPLE IT!!…recipes lie!!!

6) don’t get oversized jars because you need 10 gallons of water to cover the bastards …. and if you do, I suggest you start boiling the water before you even remotely think of canning anything because it takes forever!!

7)make sure you stay awake for 24hrs just to hear the lids pop otherwise you will always wonder who you will be poisoning next year when you give them as Xmas presents😳😳😳

8)be thankful that you didn’t also accept 10 lbs of tomatoes and a great salsa recipe🤪🤪🤪

9)just because your mother was good at canning doesn’t mean you will be… genetics don’t count!!

10) appreciate the domestic goddesses you know who do this stuff and like it!! Beverly Pavelich, Jasmine Asselin,Marilyn Gerwing,Bernie Cruikshank I am definitely humbled by this experience and am not canning worthy!!!😔😔😔😔

#fuckthisshitgotothefarmersmarketandpay20abottletheydeserveit

Now I’ve never thought of myself as a domestic goddess but I do love food. I’m particularly fond of home made baking and of garden produce whether it be canned, frozen or enjoyed fresh. The weekend hit high on both those fronts but the garden produce came at a cost.

That of cold fingers and icy chills down the neck. I always wonder why we wait till such a cold day to go dig carrots, beets and any other goodies left in the ground.

I can’t say that cleaning the harvest is my favourite thing to do but as I said, I love to eat it so it has to be clean.There were no bumper crops except maybe the pumpkin and squash. Which are still sitting in the snow.

The carrots as you can see are tiny. We were shocked to see that the 3 foot tall corn had actually produced cobs. Not a lot but enough for a thanksgiving feed so it’s now frozen and ready to be turned into creamed corn.I’ve already made 2 batches of borscht and there was still lots of beets left so they got cut up and roasted. I will pull them out in the winter and use them up. There was no beet juice anywhere but on the cutting board!

On the baking front it was time for a new recipe trial. I love pumpkin and had some smoked pumpkin in the freezer from last year that needed to be used before we harvest this year’s. So I saw this recipe for pumpkin spice cinnamon buns that looked delish!

And now you can see why I’m not a food blogger. I just do a basic flat lay picture, usually on my butcher block cupboard, and maybe edit it a bit for brightness. I might go so far as to find a nice backdrop but not very often. So while mine don’t look this good they sure tasted good!

Perhaps too good, for my own good.

Bernie