Grasslands Take 2

 

Jot notes in a well worn diary of a self confessed Canadian junkie. One who has been to at least one National Park in every province or territory except the NWT and Nunavut but you can bet those are on her list of places to go next. In her own words “Canada is amazing. Things as simple as making curry by lamplight on Lake Superior to dangling your toes in the Bay of Fundy or hiking the West Coast Trail on Vancouver Island or the Mantario Trail in the Whiteshell.  I think we should shout it from the rooftops about the things we can do here!”

So here is a second Grasslands National Park GUEST BLOG. I put the call out and the first two to answer and email pictures and text went to the same park a weekend apart! But it’s a huge park and they were totally different adventures so here below are Lynne’s jot notes and her pictures. ENJOY.

Bison herd wanders at will. Read the safety notes in the pamphlets.  Also prairie dog colonies. There were hundreds visible at one time. Burrowing owls and the black-footed ferret use the prairie dog burrows to live in. Many other at risk species live in the Park.  Again, the brochures are exceptionally informative. Be aware, there are also rattle snakes, black widow spiders and ticks. Wear appropriate clothing.  Golden eagles, hawks, shrikes and more. Coyotes and foxes. Spotted many deer and antelope.  On the east side of the park elk and moose may be seen at the right time of day. There is a very nice campground with tentrix to stay in for a cost. Tents are welcome. East side of park has a historical Centre with artifacts and buildings dating back to the Northwest Mounted Police. We had a two-day trip but will go back to camp at some point for longer.

We drove from Saskatoon to Val Marie and entered the west side of the park. Visitor centre there.  Definitely get these brochures.  Didn’t need to show our park pass as there are so many access points to the park, they can’t control entry. Grasslands is Lakota territory. Sitting Bull traveled this land.

West side of park has many buttes and the 70 Mile Point hike. You need lots of water. 2.7 K. This area gets very little precipitation and has no shade. Nice board walks. Well groomed trail. Read the history in the pamphlets. Park is returning land to its native plant and animal species.

Up next — maybe three posts about Jasper National Park? Yoho anyone? Or how about Prince Albert from a couple of different generations and angles. Also working on Cavendish with two potential guest bloggers. I will continue to edit and post as long as travelers keep submitting them to me. My goal is to highlight what a fabulous country we live in and how blessed we are.

Bernie

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